Making Talent Management Work

“Talent management is a system, not a series of stand-alone processes.”

No organization can afford to put talent management on the backburner. The loss of experience as the baby-boom generation retires, the overall shortage of talented leaders, the absolute need to engage and retain high-potential employees at every level of the organization, and an environment which demands that organizations continually do more with less, all combine to make talent management a Board-level priority.

How do organizations get it right? What lessons have we learned over the years? In reviewing their own talent management agenda what questions should those at the organization’s helm be asking? What follows are ten talent management imperatives; ten issues that, left unaddressed, put at risk the entire talent management agenda.

1. No matter who holds the title the CEO is, and must be, the organization’s Chief Talent Officer. Line and functional leaders who see talent management as a secondary priority quickly become a business liability.

2. Talent management is an organic system, not a series of stand-alone processes (see Figure one). And like any system the whole can never be stronger than the weakest link. Business leaders who fail to align the talent management system with the emerging business context are destroying value. Top teams that support investment in only one or two aspects of development and retention of the internal talent pool and who fail to aggressively address shortfalls in the rest of the system are sowing the seeds of tomorrow’s mediocrity. The dilemma: leadership myopia all too easily leads to the assumption that positive feedback around one process is a valid indicator of the health of talent management in the organization overall. Unless they are an integral part of the talent management system interventions such as 360º feedback, climate surveys and/or mentoring, no matter how well-supported initially, are destined to become yet one more administrative burden.

3. Talent management starts with a robust understanding of the cultural journey. To truly make an impact talent management has to focus on “the organization we need to be become.” Working to become ever better at who we are and what we do (talent management that reinforces the status quo) is to orchestrate tomorrow’s missed opportunity. Although both are important, there is an important difference between climate and culture. Climate is a measure of how people feel about the organization at a specific point in time. Culture describes the underlying systemic pillars that shape behaviour over the long term. Talent management means insight into and action around both.

4. The engine of talent management is talent acquisition. If the talent acquisition process is found wanting, every other talent management process is marginalized. One of the implications is that the value proposition of those charged with supporting talent acquisition (e.g. executive search) must move beyond “We know the market place better than anyone else.” Capability must encompass areas such as cultural measurement, role-specific competency profiling, team fit, leadership assessment, and executive integration. All these must be complemented by the broad range of skills and resources needed to enable the firm in question to become a full partner in supporting the organization’s talent management actions.

5. The team is the basic building block of organization growth. The challenge: if the performance management process, compensation approach, talent acquisition outlay, succession work and internal focus on coaching do not embrace the team much of the effort and investment in talent management is for naught.

6. There is value in separating the performance discussion from the ongoing and complementary performance coaching conversation. The former is periodic, focuses on the achievement of goals (or otherwise) and sets out the coaching agenda. The latter is ongoing, and is about delivering that which has been agreed in the performance discussion (the coaching agenda). The most effective performance management processes balance “the what” (outcomes) with “the how” (behaviour aligned with the organization’s values).

7. Coaching has to become an integral part of every leader’s thoughts and actions. Put simply, a leader who can’t coach can’t provide leadership; he/she isn’t creating the space for talented employees to exploit their own potential. Successful coaching is ultimately measured by the extent to which the employee moves to the next level of performance. In many instances this means helping the employee/team reframe outdated/dysfunctional mindsets. Coaching that makes a difference focuses, in the first instance, on what is working, no matter how embryonic (leveraging strengths, delivering affirmation, building pride, reinforcing early success). Coaching is an integral element in the talent management system overall; the coach must model the leadership behaviour implicit in the emerging culture and deliver in-the-moment feedback and affirmation, all while continuously coaching the team. With that in mind, the wider value of the external coach (consultant), beyond coaching leaders in how to coach and/or supporting the accelerated growth of high-potential employees, needs to be regularly challenged and evaluated.

8. When it comes to succession more is less. Succession work that makes a lasting difference focuses only on those leadership roles that are truly mission critical. The succession process must also take into account the future competitive environment; only then can the organization start to understand which of its leaders have the skills, knowledge and development potential to succeed tomorrow in the (mission critical) role he/she holds down today. There is a profound difference between succession and replacement strategies: a leader in a mission critical role who isn’t actively developing both for his/her own role is failing to fulfill his/her fiduciary responsibility.

9. Leadership workshops supporting individual development must be seen as a reward for performance excellence, not a right that goes with the individual’s role or level in the organization. Leadership workshops make a difference when the content is valid and accessible; when the “customers’ voice” is an ever-present subtext; when the learning challenges participants emotionally; when the level of abstraction contained within the material is aligned with the “conceptual horsepower” of those attending; when adequate time is set aside to challenge the ideas and views presented; when ideas, dialogue and practice are given equal weight; when reflection is part of the mix; and when the skills introduced have immediate practical application. Although measuring success is important, not everything delivered by the workshop can and should be measured. In addition to delivering “What to do differently on Monday,” it is often important that leadership workshops strive to change the way participants see the emerging business challenge. Reframing mindsets, offering participants a new lens through which to see the world, and challenging established assumptions are characteristics of success that don’t fit easily on a spreadsheet. Finally, in that real learning doesn’t begin until the participant returns to the workplace, there is a strong correlation between on-the-job follow-up and return on the investment made.

10. Talent management that thrives emphasizes a “power to” rather than a “power over” leadership approach. This speaks to transparency, risk, and allowing talented leaders to have a real say in the development journey being charted. No less important: excellence means keeping it simple!


Talent management isn’t new. Indeed, scratch the surface of any organization that has sustained outstanding performance and you will find that talent management has played a large part in that success. The talent challenge per se may not be a recent concern but the urgency and need to get it right have never been keener. And the environment has never been less forgiving to those who stumble.

For more on leadership go to Orxestra.com

Written by John Burdett

 

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